Monthly Archives: August 2013

How to talk to someone who’s grieving

It’s hard to reach out when someone dies — here’s what those who’ve been through it want to hear.

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‘If This Was Your Mother, Doctor…’

The son, quiet for most of the meeting, broke the silence and, with a hint of anger and a big dollop of frustration, asked the one question I had dreaded being asked the most: “Doc, give it to me straight. … Continue reading

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The Bible Gets an Upgrade

Is it possible to improve on the word of God? Most believers would say no, but what about improving on its user experience? After all, the text of the Bible has been shared through scrolls, codexes and movable type. Now, … Continue reading

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Acute Palliative Care Unit: A new frontier in managing patients with end-stage chronic disease

A new study shows that hospitals with specialized units combining the compassionate care of hospice and the level of care offered in medical-surgical units may provide efficient, cost effective assistance to patients with advanced chronic illness or terminal disease. The … Continue reading

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Looking for Early Signs of Dementia? Ask the Patient

Patients like this have long been “called the worried well,” said Creighton Phelps, acting chief of the dementias of aging branch of the National Institute on Aging. “People would complain, and we didn’t really think it was very valid to … Continue reading

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Medicines To Fight White Plague Are Losing Their Punch

You probably don’t think about tuberculosis much. Why would you? The number of cases in the U.S. is at an all-time low. But TB has returned with a vengeance in some parts of world, and there have been some troubling … Continue reading

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An Arizona nursing home offers new ways to care for people with dementia.

Beatitudes aims at offering dementia patients—“people who have trouble thinking”—a comfortable decline instead of imposing a medical model of care, which seeks to defer death through escalating interventions.  More. 

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